Politics of Sex & Gender

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E. C. Stanton, Seneca Falls Declaration (1848)
E. C. Stanton, Seneca Falls Declaration (1848)
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, two American activists in the movement to abolish slavery called together the first conference to address Women's rights and issues in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. Part of the reason for doing so had been that Mott had been refused permission to speak at the world anti-slavery convention in London, even though she had been an official delegate. Applying the analysis of human freedom developed in the Abolitionist movement, Stanton and others began the public career of modern feminist analysis. A foundation text of the American struggle for women's rights.
Sojourner Truth: A'nt I a Woman? (1851)
Sojourner Truth: A'nt I a Woman? (1851)
Sojourner Truth (c.1792-1883) - was the adopted name of a woman born in New York who escaped from slavery shortly before mandatory emancipation became law in the state in 1828. Truth was nearly six feet tall and physically powerful from her years of hard labor. She gave this speech - which made her famous at the time it in Akron, Ohio, at a women 's rights meeting in May, 1851. This version includes an introduction a setting of the scene.
Susan B. Anthony, Women's Right to Vote (1873)
Susan B. Anthony, Women's Right to Vote (1873)
Susan B. Anthony was one of the strongest advocates of Women's rights in the mid-19th century, and is a representative figure of this politically oriented types of feminists politics. . IN 1872 she was arrested after casting an 'illegal' vote in the presidential election. She was fined $100 but refused to pay. She delivered this speech in 1873
Masculinity and Facial Hair in Nineteenth-Century America
Masculinity and Facial Hair in Nineteenth-Century America
Why did so many 19th century politicians have exuberant facial hair? What can those moustaches, beards, sideburns and other forms of facial furniture tell us about the way men and women defined masculinity and femininity?
Theodore Roosevelt,"The Strenuous Life" (1899)
Theodore Roosevelt,"The Strenuous Life" (1899)
How did Theodore Roosevelt envisage masculinity (male attributes) at a time of industrialisation and empire?
Suffragists Oral History Project
Suffragists Oral History Project
In the early 1970s the Suffragists Oral History Project, under the auspices of the Bancroft Library's Regional Oral History Office, collected interviews with twelve leaders and participants in the woman's suffrage movement. Tape-recorded and transcribed oral histories preserved the memories of these remarkable women, documenting formative experiences, activities to win the right to vote for women, and careers as leaders of the movements for welfare and labor reform, world peace, and the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. Now, 25 years later, the nineteenth century meets the twenty-first as the words of these activist women, born from the 1860s to the 1890s, are made accessible for future scholarly research and public information via the Internet. A great resource for those who have already conducted some preliminary research.
NAWSA Collection (1848-1921)
NAWSA Collection (1848-1921)
The NAWSA Collection consists of 167 books, pamphlets and other artifacts documenting the suffrage campaign. They are a subset of the Library's larger collection donated by Carrie Chapman Catt, longtime president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, in November of 1938. The collection includes works from the libraries of other members and officers of the organization including: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, Alice Stone Blackwell, Julia Ward Howe, Elizabeth Smith Miller, Mary A. Livermore.
New York Times Coverage of the passage of the 19th Amendment (1919-20)
New York Times Coverage of the passage of the 19th Amendment (1919-20)
A series of articles from the New York Times detailing the passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution in Congress and the battle to get the Amendment ratified by the states. The Amendment was passed by Congress on June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 19, 1920.
Alfred Kinsey's 1948 and 1953 Studies
Alfred Kinsey's 1948 and 1953 Studies
Data from Alfred Kinsey's groundbreaking research into the American public's sexual habits. The first analysis of men was released in 1948, the second study on women followed in 1953.
OutHistory: Harry Hay Interview & Documents
OutHistory: Harry Hay Interview & Documents
Harry Hay was the founder of the first prominent Gay Rights organisation in the United States. The first Mattachine Society was founded by Hay in the early 1950s. This interview, conducted in 1974, details how and why Hay chose to form the organisation.
One: National Gay & Lesbian Archives Photograph Collection
One: National Gay & Lesbian Archives Photograph Collection
As the title might suggest, a site containing over 600 images of the cultural, social & political history of the gay rights movement.
The Kameny Papers
The Kameny Papers
Frank Kameny was a pioneer of the struggle for gay equality. This site features articles by him, but also memorabilia from Kameny's long struggle - from the 1950s til his death in 2011 - to win equal rights for Homosexuals.
Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique Ch1 (1963)
Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique Ch1 (1963)
A pdf of the famous first chapter of Friedan's book. Exactly what was the problem Friedan identified and who did it effect?
YouTube: Firing Line William F. Buckley Interviews Hugh Hefner (1966)
YouTube: Firing Line William F. Buckley Interviews Hugh Hefner (1966)
Conservative commentator William F. Buckley locks horns with the founder of Playboy in this 1966 interview spread over a number of clips. The two debate Christian morals, moral authority and liberal values. An intriguing insight into Hefener's attempts to underpin Playboy with an intellectual position and Buckley's attempt to challenge that.
NOW Statement of Purpose (1966)
NOW Statement of Purpose (1966)
The founding document of the National Organisation of Women.
Stonewall Riot Police Reports, June 28, 1969
Stonewall Riot Police Reports, June 28, 1969
Police documents provide an immediate sense of what the police called an "Unusual Occurrence" at the Stonewall Inn. Some of these are quite hard to read, given the handwriting, but an important set of documents.
Proposed Equal Rights Amendment (1972)
Proposed Equal Rights Amendment (1972)
An Equal Rights Amendment, barring discrimination on grounds of sex, had first been proposed by Alice Paul in the 1920s. This was the Amendment Congress passed in 1972, but which failed to become law due to vociferous opposition to ratification.
PBS: The Pill - Contraceptive Pill timeline
PBS: The Pill - Contraceptive Pill timeline
A companion site to a tv special. Offers a useful social history of the development and introduction of the contraceptive pill.
Time.Com: Visual History of the Gay Rights Movement
Time.Com: Visual History of the Gay Rights Movement
Slideshow of photographs and text, beginning with Stonewall in 1969 and charting the struggle for equality.
American Experience: Stonewall
American Experience: Stonewall
90 min video from PBS charting what happened when police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City on June 28, 1969. The street erupted into violent protests that lasted for the next six days. The Stonewall riots, as they came to be known, marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.