SNCC, CORE, Sit-Ins & Freedom Rides 1960-61

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Greensboro Sit-ins: Launch of a Civil Rights Movement
Greensboro Sit-ins: Launch of a Civil Rights Movement
If Montgomery launched the career of Martin Luther King, it was the Greensboro sit-in of February 1960 that led to the creation of SNCC and the rise of youth activism. This site contains biographies, timelines and oral history to explore how and why the Greensboro sit-in was such a key moment in the struggle for black freedom.
SNCC 1960-1966 Six years of SNCC
SNCC 1960-1966 Six years of SNCC
Website focussing on the Student Nonviolent Co-ordinating Committee in its radical nonviolent integrationist phase. Contains biographies, a useful timeline, and audio. A good place to start.
Voices of SNCC
Voices of SNCC
9 short-ish interviews with SNCC veterans explaining their motivations for joining the campaign. Useful for understanding how and why northern white college students felt compelled to join the struggle despite having no direct experience of racial injustice.
Student Voice - SNCC Newspaper
Student Voice - SNCC Newspaper
16 editions of the SNCC newspaper 'Student Voice' covering the period 1964 & 1965. Presented in PDF format.
Statements of discipline of non-violent movements
Statements of discipline of non-violent movements
This undated scanned document from the early 1960s provides an insight into how SNCC & CORE based their actions around nonviolence. It contains rules and codes of behaviour for those protesting, confronted by opposition and those who had been jailed. What does this tell you about the nature of the struggle?
Diane Nash & the sit-ins (video)
Diane Nash & the sit-ins (video)
In this video, Diane Nash - a co-founder of SNCC - explains her role organising sit-ins and freedom rides in Tennessee and beyond.
BBC: James Meredith recalls the struggles of the 1960s
BBC: James Meredith recalls the struggles of the 1960s
James Meredity, the man who integrated 'Ole Miss' reflects on his campaigning past and his critique of the current incumbent in the White House.
PBS: Freedom Riders
PBS: Freedom Riders
Site supporting the authoritative PBS documentary. Contains the full documentary, a timeline an interactive map. A fantastic place to start understanding the Freedom Rides and their relationship to the wider movement.
James Farmer to JFK, Letter explaining the Freedom Rides (26/4/61)
James Farmer to JFK, Letter explaining the Freedom Rides (26/4/61)
The letter to the president from James Farmer, National Director of CORE, explaining the nature and purpose of the proposed Freedom Rides. How does the letter reflect the non-violent ideology in action?
James Farmer to JFK, Telegram re: attack on Freedom Riders (14/5/61)
James Farmer to JFK, Telegram re: attack on Freedom Riders (14/5/61)
In the face of mob violence in Alabama, James Farmer contacted the White House to detail the violence. How does the telegram reflect the danger facing the Freedom Riders and CORE's strategy?
AP: Freedom Rides Map & Background Content
AP: Freedom Rides Map & Background Content
The Associated Press Agency produced this map in 1961 to help explain the Freedom Rides for the newspapers it supplied information to. Helpfully details the path of both the CORE buses, and the SNCC-organised Freedom Rides which began when the CORE activists could not continue due to arrest, intimidation and injury.
CORE: Justice (1962)
CORE: Justice (1962)
CORE produced this pamphlet to record and reproduce the hearings held in May, 1962, of the Committee of Inquiry into the Administration of Justice in the Freedom Struggle. The testimony of a number of SNCC & CORE activists, many of them students, gives a sense of their commitment and the opposition faced.