Abolitionism

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American Abolitionism
American Abolitionism
Maps, biographies, narratives - a useful archive and directory on the abolitionist movement.
The Liberator: Online Archive
The Liberator: Online Archive
These are complete archived issues of, and transcribed articles from, William Lloyd Garrison’s newspaper The Liberator (1831-1865), the most prominent periodical of radical Abolitionism in the united states of America. You can find scanned PDF documents of full issues of The Liberator, as well as a number of individual articles & columns. If you want an insight into radical abolitionism, this is a great site to explore.
Selected Writings of Douglass and Others
Selected Writings of Douglass and Others
A large number of autobiographical and political writings by Douglass on slavery, abolition,war & emancipation.
Frederick Douglass: Speeches,articles,letters & reports
Frederick Douglass: Speeches,articles,letters & reports
Over 30 texts by Douglass,recounting his life in slavery,his work as an abolitionist and his continued political agitation after slavery.
William Lloyd Garrison - Texts
William Lloyd Garrison - Texts
A set of letters,speeches & articles by one of the leading figures in the struggle for abolition.
Manifesto of the American Anti-Slavery Society (1833)
Manifesto of the American Anti-Slavery Society (1833)
In December 1833, more than 60 abolitionists met in Philadelphia and founded the American Anti-Slavery Society. Devoted to immediate and uncompensated emancipation for African-American slaves, the members of the society drafted the following manifesto to articulate clearly their goals. They based their opposition to slavery both on the principle of equality as stated in the Declaration of Independence and on the commands of Biblical scripture. Maintaining that slavery was a grievous sin, the society championed nonviolence and racial equality. Its membership included several African Americans, although women from both races were excluded from the group.
F. Douglass, What to the Slave is the Fourth of July? (5/7/1852)
F. Douglass, What to the Slave is the Fourth of July? (5/7/1852)
One of Frederick Douglass' most famous speeches on the relationship between American values and slavery.
F. Douglass, “No Struggle...No Progress” (3/8/1857)
F. Douglass, “No Struggle...No Progress” (3/8/1857)
On August 3, 1857, Frederick Douglass delivered a “West India Emancipation” speech at Canandaigua, New York, on the twenty-third anniversary of the event. Most of the address was a history of British efforts toward emancipation as well as a reminder of the crucial role of the West Indian slaves in that own freedom struggle. However shortly after he began Douglass sounded a foretelling of the coming Civil War when he uttered two paragraphs that became the most quoted sentences of all of his public orations. They began with the words, “If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” The entire speech appears below.
Mirror of Race
Mirror of Race
American photographs from the nineteenth century exploring how questions of race were depicted in Photography. Gives you some shocking images and interpretation of images.
Uncle Tom's Cabin & American Culture
Uncle Tom's Cabin & American Culture
A great site for students exploring the literary or historical context of Beecher Stowe's book. Contains links to texts which influenced the book, reviews and responses from pro and antislavery critics and details of the some of the adaptations of the novel that followed.